Modification of Brain Aging and Neurodegenerative Disorders by Genes, Diet, and Behavior

 

PUBLICATION
Physiological Reviews

AUTHOR(S)
MARK P. MATTSON, SIC L. CHAN, AND WENZHEN DUAN

ABSTRACT
Multiple molecular, cellular, structural, and functional changes occur in the brain during aging. Neural cells may respond to these changes adaptively, or they may succumb to neurodegenerative cascades that result in disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Multiple mechanisms are employed to maintain the integrity of nerve cell circuits and to facilitate responses to environmental demands and promote recovery of function after injury. The mechanisms include production of neuro-trophic factors and cytokines, expression of various cell survival-promoting proteins (e.g., protein chaperones, antioxidant enzymes, Bcl-2 and inhibitor of apoptosis proteins), preservation of genomic integrity by telomerase and DNA repair proteins, and mobilization of neural stem cells to replace damaged neurons and glia. The aging process challenges such neuroprotective and neurorestorative mechanisms. Genetic and environmental factors superimposed upon the aging process can determine whether brain aging is successful or unsuccessful. Mutations in genes that cause inherited forms of Alzheimer’s disease (amyloid precursor protein and presenilins), Parkinson’s disease.

DATE
October 2002

RELATED TOPICS
DIET, AGING, ALZHEIMER’SPARKINSON’S

 

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